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oberhamsi
oberhamsi
oberhamsi
Stuart Brown, president of the National Institute for Play, was speaking at the New York Public Library’s main branch on 42nd Street. He created the institute in 1996, after more than 20 years of psychiatric practice and research persuaded him of the dangerous long-term consequences of play deprivation. In a sold-out talk at the library, he and Krista Tippett, host of the public-radio program ‘‘Speaking of Faith,’’ discussed the biological and spiritual underpinnings of play. Brown called play part of the ‘‘developmental sequencing of becoming a human primate. If you look at what produces learning and memory and well-being, play is as fundamental as any other aspect of life, including sleep and dreams.’’
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/17/magazine/17play.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0
oberhamsi
Summing up the formal characteristic of play, we might call it a free activity standing quite consciously outside 'ordinary' life as being 'not serious' but at the same time absorbing the player intensely and utterly. It is an activity connected with no material interest, and no profit can be gained by it. It proceeds within its own proper boundaries of time and space according to fixed rules and in an orderly manner. It promotes the formation of social groupings that tend to surround themselves with secrecy and to stress the difference from the common world by disguise or other means.
— Homo Ludens, Johan Huizinga
Tags: theory
oberhamsi
oberhamsi
I'm finding that the best way to learn this game very early on is to take one of the existing ships, damage it, then figure out how to repair it to its original appearance. Using the intact sides for eyeball comparison value.

I took the big blue ship, rammed it a little on the right front side with the big red ship, crushing part of the front hangar section and the neck. Then I took the blue ship, flew it beside the platform and started to rebuild it, with the goal of returning it to its original state.

It was a good way to learn. I had to break out several complex angles and corners. Not to mention things like internal lights and thrusters.

Once I had spent a couple of hours doing that, I felt a lot more comfortable experimenting and my "work" speed on the game increased quite a bit as I got the hang of it.
http://forums.keenswh.com/post/my-favorite-newbie-self-learning-technique-6616918
oberhamsi
Oblivion was the first RPG that I played where you could pick up almost anything. At first I was picking up cups, forks, bowls, etc. thinking that everything would be used eventually.
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Short introduction to a seemingly very complex space game. X3TC Walkthrough Introduction, Navigation, Flying and using the Interface.
oberhamsi
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"Ride Off Into the Sunset"(player describes a scene; no one dies)

oberhamsi
oberhamsi
oberhamsi
Chivalry dev: "and when you lose instead of being frustrated… being shot from 300 feet away you actually have that sense of appreciation for that person" http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=6GnuCjueong#!

that is so true. in bf3 i always think "well yeah, he saw me first… lucker". in chivalry some servers are duel only by gentleman agreement! (which works when most of the server actively help kick the non gentlemen)
oberhamsi
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a playthrough of mass effect 3 with offensive comments
oberhamsi
Dust is the work for which I am best known. I wish it was due to my brilliance, intelligence, level design knack and astonishingly good looks, but actually, the main element was luck. It was all the right bits in the right place at the right time. The result far exceeded anything I could have imagined or planned to make - Dust just 'happened'.

 Some say the reason for Dust's success was its simplicity. Others say it's due to how balanced it is. In reality, the two are closely linked - the simpler a map is, the easier it is to balance. In essence, it's hard to make a simple map play badly.
http://www.johnsto.co.uk/design/making_dust
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real life de_dust boxes/crates

oberhamsi

Many small details of the game were designed to generate some emotional response. For instance, I really like the airport map. It's a wide empty area with nothing but some strange guy waiting for you behind a shadow. I wanted that to be discomforting and slightly intimidating.

Another aspect which was deliberately planned was to have those "mash buttons 1/2" moments with some torture devices. I wanted players to DO something during the torture and I believe there's an actual physical effort in pressing buttons as fast as possible. I wanted this small effort to be the equivalent of something that felt violent... like choking someone, repeatedly stabbing, or something. I wanted the player to feel "I AM DOING THIS". I also wanted the torture scoring (and therefore the reviews) to be initially frustrating, so the player would know what Verge feels.

There are tons of small details designed with such purposes. Not all of them will provoke reactions with everyone. But I expect them to, as a whole, succeed in making the game a disturbing experience.

http://www.electrondance.com/?p=852
oberhamsi
We’re not the only designers who think that computer technology has a lot more to offer than dress up games. But we’ve been a bit scattered so far, and whenever we communicate our ideas in public, or even show our work we meet with the brick wall of intolerance of the games industry and the gamers audience. People like games, and they like them so much that they don’t want anybody to make anything else but games.

Rather than continue those endless debates with the fiero junkies, we have decided to join forces. We’re calling this project the Notgames Initiative… the idea is to explore the potential of digital entertainment and art that is not games. By explicitly rejecting the typical game elements of rules and goals and challenges and rewards, we hope to discover new ways to delight and enlighten our audience. Ways that give us more freedom in terms of subject matter and emotional response. It’s important to point out that notgames is not a category of entertainment or art. Instead, it is a method to design, a challenge to designers and artists.

Notgames is not an ideology, either. It’s not necessary to radically choose to never makes games again. We can make a game one day and a not-so-game another. It’s about broadening the spectrum, not narrowing it down. A few weeks ago we started a web forum where we are discussing this new form of design…

We hope and believe that our pioneering work with our little group will inspire and encourage more mainstream designers to create digital entertainment for all the hungry people out there who are not enchanted with videogames the way they are now.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nlep9kT1API#t=16m40s
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The PC Gamer Arma 2 community embark on a mission to save Joe Takistan from a volcano or something.
oberhamsi
[...] ein bedrückendes Mahnmal menschlicher Hybris. Es handelt davon, wie der Mensch seine Grenzen überschreitet und damit alle Regeln außer Kraft setzt, von einem Tag auf den nächsten die Zivilisation wegfegt. Ein anomischer Zustand, in dem alte Regeln von neuen, wilden, ungezügelten Gesetzen ersetzt werden. Die Stalker, und damit auch der Spieler, sind Zeugen des Unglücks, Pioniere und Siedler in einer neuen, pervertierten Welt - die doch nur die alte ist: Eine finstere Metapher für die zuweilen gesetzlos wirkenden Trümmer der Sowjetunion.
http://www.spiegel.de/netzwelt/spielzeug/0,1518,475313-2,00.html
oberhamsi
Propaganda posters for Battlefield Bad Company 2 telling player about common or often ridiculed mistakes new players make.
Reposted bytapdingo tapdingo
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